The Fifth Pillar of SEO Success? Trust

Discover how creating a trustworthy domain is crucial for your SEO strategy.

by Jason Bagley

Podcast

| 5 min read

In this episode, Jason and Justin are breaking down how to run a successful SEO campaign into 6 simple parts and creating a trustworthy domain is a huge part of your SEO strategy.

Justin discusses the meaning of a trustworthy domain, and how to create one in two parts.

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Full episode transcript


About the Smart Marketing podcast

Whether you’re a business owner, seasoned marketing professional, or just starting out, the Smart Marketing podcast will help advance your knowledge by sharing the latest in SEO, paid advertising, email marketing, content marketing, social media, and conversion optimization.

Your hosts — Jason Bagley and Justin Lester — bring you regular, actionable digital marketing tips, tactics, and strategies that you can use to improve your marketing.

Jason Bagley is the VP of Digital Strategy for SiteCare and Justin Lester, the founder of Ruby Digital, a digital marketing agency from Cape Town, South Africa.

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Full episode transcript

Justin:
Jay, man.

Jason:
Justin, how are you doing?

Justin:
Good, good, good, good. What are we talking about today?

Jason:
So I know this time we are talking about, this is the fifth pillar, and it’s all about trustworthiness. I just want to know how trustworthy you are about this subject?

Justin:
Well that’s open to interpretation. But basically the point is that as part of our six part episode, and I suggest you go check out for a bit more context, go check out our previous episodes where really we’re just trying to break down how to run a successful SEO campaign in six key parts. The fifth part of that is, how trustworthy your website is. And trustworthiness can be broken up into two parts. So one of the key ways, and we spoke about it in the last two episodes, is how many links you get? How authoritative those links are that are linking to you? And then also most key is, how trustworthy are those links that are pointing to you?

Justin:
So often people get authoritativeness and trust mixed up. They think, “Well, okay. You could get a major news publication that could be considered trustworthy in the eyes of the public.” But yet it isn’t necessarily, it’s more an authoritative site. So an example of a very high trustworthy site would be things like .edu, domains, educational websites, .gov, websites that have the .gov TLD. These are links that are typically very, very sorry. These are websites that are very typically difficult to get a link. And if they’re citing your website, it’s always a very, very good trustworthy signal.

Justin:
So again, if you have to get a link from harvard.edu, I can’t remember the exact name. But that trust and that association is really going to flow into your website. And Google is going to feel a lot more confident pushing you up the rankings. There are, again, we spoke about site explorer tools, which can go and crawl the web, all the links that are pointing to your website. And you’ll notice they use a metric, one of the metrics as they call it, is trust flow. So again, a rating out of a 100 to see how trustworthy you are.

Justin:
And then that’s really the first part to trustworthiness. And the second part is also the age of your website. So you’ll notice that statistically older websites are more likely to rank higher than newer websites. Because think about it, logically trust is gained over time, right? You can’t just be trusted. You have to earn your reputation. And one of the ways to do that is by being there for a long period of time. Because if you think about the logic, Google doesn’t want to put you at the top of their search results when they don’t know if you’re still going to be around in six months from now. Or they don’t know if you’re still going to be around in 12 months from now. Because if someone looks for something, they go back and that website no longer exists, well, that’s going to be a really bad experience.

Justin:
So Google wants you to just demonstrate that you’re there and you’re there for the long haul. And I guess you’ll notice even when you’re trying to buy websites, one of the key things they’ll list is how old is that website. And this is also another issue that we find when people have brand new websites and they want to have SEO. And often there’s unreasonable expectations there, because they’re trying to say, “Well, okay, ranking normally takes a few months to achieve.” But when you’ve got a newer site, it’s made that much more difficult. So those are always things to take into consideration.

Jason:
Justin, I remember the good old days. And when it came to SEI, I keep talking about this, but the Sandbox, is the Sandbox still a thing? Because I remember-

Justin:
So I guess Sandboxing is really the age of your domain. I can’t remember a 100%, but your website is Sandboxed a bit. So sometimes people, what they would do is, if they knew they were going to really push a website, they would actually build these sites, put a bit of content on them, let them sit. If you could think of it as almost like a fine wine, you sort of let it age over time. And then when they’re really wanting to launch it, it’s already got a bit of trust and authority from Google.

Justin:
So I’ll give you one little hack that you can use. And it probably doesn’t carry as much value as it did before, but Google can tell how long your domain is registered for. So with some providers you can register for a longer period of time. So I think some guys even offer five to seven years for your domain to be registered for. And that is very cool signal and indicator to Google that, “Hey, you’re committed. You’re here for the long term.” Whereas opposed to, if you’ve only done for one year, it doesn’t necessarily send the best signal.

Justin:
So, that that’s a little something that you can do that’s quite easy that can help just reinforce the trust of your site. But getting trustworthy, people linking to you, giving a site a better time to age. And then, like I said, just add a couple of extra years up to that domain registration, all of that will help.

Jason:
Awesome. Thank you so much for that, Justin. I felt like you’re a trustworthy podcast host and being able to comment on this.

Justin:
Well thank you Jay.

Jason:
Pleasure.

Justin:
I appreciate it.

Jason:
Cool. Thank you so much. And we will see all of you after a couple of thumbs up, five stars, in the next episode.

Justin:
Peace. Laters.

Jason Bagley | Vice President, Digital Strategy